Category Archives: news

Advanced Dataset Search Documentation Added

The easiest way to find the files you’re looking for is to use the CMIP5 Community Storage Server – Advanced Dataset Search page. This page provides free-text and faceted search functionality of all available data files and a dynamic, paginated result table. FTP and HTTP links to the data files are provided in the result table to allow users to download files of interest directly from the search page. Additionally, the result set – including paths and file names – may be downloaded in a variety of different formats including CSV, JSON, PHP, Python, and XML.

For more information on how to use the search page, see the Advanced Dataset Search: User Manual.

Advance Dataset Search Documentation

Advance Dataset Search Documentation

Statistics Page Added

A Statistics page has been added in which I have used Google’s JavaScript Visualization API to render some interactive plots and charts illustrating sever usage statistics and dataset distribution and characteristics.

Dowloading & Storage

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Downloads Temporarily Halted!

CMIP5 dataset downloads are temporarily halted as the wget scripts are failing to retrieve ESGF certificates used to verify the identity of the host data nodes. These certificates expire and must be refreshed periodically, which requires that I manually provide the login credentials for my openID. However, the server hosting my openID (https://pcmdi9.llnl.gov/esgf-idp/openid/aekholm) is down, and consequently the certificates cannot be retrieved.

Hopefully, this a temporary issue. I will continue to check the status of the openID provider periodically.

Alex

UPDATE (10/29 08:35): Other data nodes are still up (e.g. DKRZ), but the MyProxyLogon is redirected to http://rainbow.llnl.gov/dist/esg-myproxy-logon/MyProxyLogon.jnlp (which is down) from each data node.

UPDATE (10/30 17:45): The error causing the wget scripts to fail is shown below.

 

About People Page Added

The About – People page has been add to recognize the people who, with the support of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, have made the CMIP5 Community Storage Sever possible…

Development, Administration, & Support

For questions or comments related to technical support or ongoing development, please contact:


Alexander K. Ekholm
Engineer I
Physical Oceanography
Office Phone: +1 508 289 4930
aekholm@whoi.edu

 

Direct Contributors

Special thanks goes out to the following people for their direct and continued contributions to the CMIP5 Community Storage Project.

Caroline Ummenhofer
Caroline Ummenhofer
Assistant Scientist
Physical Oceanography
Office Phone: +1 508 289 2507
cummenhofer@whoi.edu
Ivan D. Lima
Ivan D. Lima
Research Specialist
Marine Chemistry & Geochemistry
Office Phone: +1 508 289 3659
ilima@whoi.edu
Kristopher Karnauskas
Kristopher Karnauskas
Associate Scientist
Geology & Geophysics
Office Phone: +1 508 289 3320
kkarnauskas@whoi.edu
Steven R. Jayne
Steven R. Jayne
Senior Scientist
Physical Oceanography
Office Phone: +1 508 289 3520
sjayne@whoi.edu
Young-Oh Kwon
Young-Oh Kwon
Associate Scientist
Physical Oceanography
Office Phone: +1 508 289 2901
Fax: +1 508 457 2181
ykwon@whoi.edu

 

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About CMIP5 Page Added

The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) represents a collaborative effort involving 20 climate modeling groups from around the world – the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM), as part of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). At a September 2008 meeting, the WGCM, with input from the International Geospher-Biosphere Programme (IGBP)‘s Analysis, Integration and Modelling of the Earth System (AIMES) project, agreed to promote a new set of coordinated climate model experiments. These experiments comprise the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. CMIP5 will notably provide a multi-model context for
  1. assessing the mechanisms responsible for model differences in poorly understood feedbacks associated with the carbon cycle and with clouds,
  2. examining climate “predictability” and exploring the ability of models to predict climate on decadal time scales, and, more generally, and
  3. determining why similarly forced models produce a range of responses.

Read more…